• Prescribing Information for Capsules
  • Prescribing Information for Tablets
  • Patient Site
  • Dosing & Therapy Management

    Monitoring

    Proactively monitor patients to help manage potential side effects

    Monitor complete blood counts (CBCs) prior to the start of IBRANCE therapy, on Days 1 and 15 of the first 2 cycles, on Day 1 of subsequent cycles, and as clinically indicated.

    The frequency of CBC monitoring can decrease over time

    For patients who experience a maximum of Grade 1 or 2 neutropenia in the first 6 cycles, monitor CBCs for subsequent cycles every 3 months, prior to the beginning of a cycle and as clinically indicated.

    *Prior to starting therapy.

    When scheduling Day 15 monitoring and subsequent follow-up visits, remember to consider when the patient actually receives their medication and initiates each cycle.

    Monitoring for interstitial lung disease (ILD)/pneumonitis

    Monitor patients for pulmonary symptoms indicative of ILD/pneumonitis (e.g., hypoxia, cough, dyspnea).

    Additional monitoring considerations

    • ECG, serum electrolyte, or liver enzyme tests are not required in the current IBRANCE Prescribing Information 
      • In a QTc substudy of 77 patients from PALOMA-2, no large effect (>20 ms) on the QTc interval was observed in patients taking IBRANCE
      • In this substudy, the mean change from baseline for QTc was <8 ms with IBRANCE at all post-baseline time points in the QTc assessment period vs <7 ms in the control arm1
    • Additional monitoring may be necessary based on the individual patient

    Reference:
    1. Durairaj C, Ruiz-Garcia A, Gauthier ER, et al. Palbociclib has no clinically relevant effect on the QTc interval in patients with advanced breast cancer. Anticancer Drugs. 2018;29(3):271-280. 

    Details on neutropenia reported with IBRANCE + aromatase inhibitor 

    Review the data

    Details on neutropenia reported with IBRANCE + fulvestrant

    Review the data

    Recommended dose modifications for IBRANCE

    Learn more

    Warnings and Precautions with IBRANCE

    See the details

    Neutropenia was the most frequently reported adverse reaction in PALOMA-2 (80%) and PALOMA-3 (83%). In PALOMA-2, Grade 3 (56%) or 4 (10%) decreased neutrophil counts were reported in patients receiving IBRANCE plus letrozole. In PALOMA-3, Grade 3 (55%) or Grade 4 (11%) decreased neutrophil counts were reported in patients receiving IBRANCE plus fulvestrant. Febrile neutropenia has been reported in 1.8% of patients exposed to IBRANCE across PALOMA-2 and PALOMA-3. One death due to neutropenic sepsis was observed in PALOMA-3. Inform patients to promptly report any fever.

    Monitor complete blood count prior to starting IBRANCE, at the beginning of each cycle, on Day 15 of first 2 cycles and as clinically indicated. Dose interruption, dose reduction, or delay in starting treatment cycles is recommended for patients who develop Grade 3 or 4 neutropenia.

    Severe, life-threatening, or fatal interstitial lung disease (ILD) and/or pneumonitis can occur in patients treated with CDK4/6 inhibitors, including IBRANCE when taken in combination with endocrine therapy. Across clinical trials (PALOMA-1, PALOMA-2, PALOMA-3), 1.0% of IBRANCE-treated patients had ILD/pneumonitis of any grade, 0.1% had Grade 3 or 4, and no fatal cases were reported. Additional cases of ILD/pneumonitis have been observed in the post-marketing setting, with fatalities reported.

    Monitor patients for pulmonary symptoms indicative of ILD/pneumonitis (e.g., hypoxia, cough, dyspnea). In patients who have new or worsening respiratory symptoms and are suspected to have developed pneumonitis, interrupt IBRANCE immediately and evaluate the patient. Permanently discontinue IBRANCE in patients with severe ILD or pneumonitis.

    Based on the mechanism of action, IBRANCE can cause fetal harm. Advise females of reproductive potential to use effective contraception during IBRANCE treatment and for at least 3 weeks after the last dose. IBRANCE may impair fertility in males and has the potential to cause genotoxicity. Advise male patients to consider sperm preservation before taking IBRANCE. Advise male patients with female partners of reproductive potential to use effective contraception during IBRANCE treatment and for 3 months after the last dose. Advise females to inform their healthcare provider of a known or suspected pregnancy. Advise women not to breastfeed during IBRANCE treatment and for 3 weeks after the last dose because of the potential for serious adverse reactions in nursing infants. 

    The most common adverse reactions (≥10%) of any grade reported in PALOMA-2 for IBRANCE plus letrozole vs placebo plus letrozole were neutropenia (80% vs 6%), infections (60% vs 42%), leukopenia (39% vs 2%), fatigue (37% vs 28%), nausea (35% vs 26%), alopecia (33% vs 16%), stomatitis (30% vs 14%), diarrhea (26% vs 19%), anemia (24% vs 9%), rash (18% vs 12%), asthenia (17% vs 12%), thrombocytopenia (16% vs 1%), vomiting (16% vs 17%), decreased appetite (15% vs 9%), dry skin (12% vs 6%), pyrexia (12% vs 9%), and dysgeusia (10% vs 5%).

    The most frequently reported Grade ≥3 adverse reactions (≥5%) in PALOMA-2 for IBRANCE plus letrozole vs placebo plus letrozole were neutropenia (66% vs 2%), leukopenia (25% vs 0%), infections (7% vs 3%), and anemia (5% vs 2%).

    Lab abnormalities of any grade occurring in PALOMA-2 for IBRANCE plus letrozole vs placebo plus letrozole were decreased WBC (97% vs 25%), decreased neutrophils (95% vs 20%), anemia (78% vs 42%), decreased platelets (63% vs 14%), increased aspartate aminotransferase (52% vs 34%), and increased alanine aminotransferase (43% vs 30%). 

    The most common adverse reactions (≥10%) of any grade reported in PALOMA-3 for IBRANCE plus fulvestrant vs placebo plus fulvestrant were neutropenia (83% vs 4%), leukopenia (53% vs 5%), infections (47% vs 31%), fatigue (41% vs 29%), nausea (34% vs 28%), anemia (30% vs 13%), stomatitis (28% vs 13%), diarrhea (24% vs 19%), thrombocytopenia (23% vs 0%), vomiting (19% vs 15%), alopecia (18% vs 6%), rash (17% vs 6%), decreased appetite (16% vs 8%), and pyrexia (13% vs 5%).

    The most frequently reported Grade ≥3 adverse reactions (≥5%) in PALOMA-3 for IBRANCE plus fulvestrant vs placebo plus fulvestrant were neutropenia (66% vs 1%) and leukopenia (31% vs 2%). 

    Lab abnormalities of any grade occurring in PALOMA-3 for IBRANCE plus fulvestrant vs placebo plus fulvestrant were decreased WBC (99% vs 26%), decreased neutrophils (96% vs 14%), anemia (78% vs 40%), decreased platelets (62% vs 10%), increased aspartate aminotransferase (43% vs 48%), and increased alanine aminotransferase (36% vs 34%). 

    Avoid concurrent use of strong CYP3A inhibitors. If patients must be administered a strong CYP3A inhibitor, reduce the IBRANCE dose to 75 mg. If the strong inhibitor is discontinued, increase the IBRANCE dose (after 3-5 half-lives of the inhibitor) to the dose used prior to the initiation of the strong CYP3A inhibitor. Grapefruit or grapefruit juice may increase plasma concentrations of IBRANCE and should be avoided. Avoid concomitant use of strong CYP3A inducers. The dose of sensitive CYP3A substrates with a narrow therapeutic index may need to be reduced as IBRANCE may increase their exposure.

    For patients with severe hepatic impairment (Child-Pugh class C), the recommended dose of IBRANCE is 75 mg. The pharmacokinetics of IBRANCE have not been studied in patients requiring hemodialysis

    Please see full Prescribing Information for IBRANCE capsules and tablets.

    IBRANCE (palbociclib) 125 mg capsules and tablets are indicated for the treatment of adult patients with hormone receptor-positive (HR+), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative (HER2-) advanced or metastatic breast cancer (mBC) in combination with:

    • an aromatase inhibitor as initial endocrine-based therapy in postmenopausal women or in men, or
    • fulvestrant in patients with disease progression following endocrine therapy

    INDICATIONS

    IBRANCE (palbociclib) 125 mg capsules and tablets are indicated for the treatment of adult patients with hormone receptor-positive (HR+), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative (HER2-) advanced or metastatic breast cancer (mBC) in combination with:

    • an aromatase inhibitor as initial endocrine-based therapy in postmenopausal women or in men, or
    • fulvestrant in patients with disease progression following endocrine therapy